In-spite of an extremely dry Saskatchewan spring, camelina thrives

In-spite of an extremely dry Saskatchewan spring, camelina thrives  


NEWS / PUBLISHED: AUG-27-2019

Another Camelina Advantage!

It was a very dry spring, most places in Saskatchewan did not receive adequate moisture for germination well into June. Camelina is a great option for delayed seeding due to insufficient moisture. Camelina matures on average 10 days earlier than Canola avoiding the risk of fall frost.

Camelina needs to be seeded shallow, no more than ½ inch deep. It was a very challenging spring for many growers with the early drought, it caused spotty, delayed emergence. This caused many fields to have uneven crop maturities, especially in flax and canola.

Here is Denis' Camelina advantage story!

Denis has grown camelina with Smart Earth Seeds for 5 years now.

He seeds his camelina on light-sandy soils that cannot sustain decent canola yields. With his
camelina experience, Denis knew that the soil moisture was not sufficient this spring to get his
camelina to germinate. He made the decision to wait out the spring drought. His camelina was
sown later than most would feel comfortable with.

You wouldn't seed canola or flax as late as June 13th!

Another Camelina Advantage!

It was a very dry spring, most places in Saskatchewan did not receive adequate moisture for germination well into June. Camelina is a great option for delayed seeding due to insufficient moisture. Camelina matures on average 10 days earlier than Canola avoiding the risk of fall frost.

Camelina needs to be seeded shallow, no more than ½ inch deep. It was a very challenging spring for many growers with the early drought, it caused spotty, delayed emergence. This caused many fields to have uneven crop maturities, especially in flax and canola.

Here is Denis' Camelina advantage story!

Denis has grown camelina with Smart Earth Seeds for 5 years now.

He seeds his camelina on light-sandy soils that cannot sustain decent canola yields. With hiscamelina experience, Denis knew that the soil moisture was not sufficient this spring to get his camelina to germinate. He made the decision to wait out the spring drought. His camelina was sown later than most would feel comfortable with.

You wouldn't seed canola or flax as late as June 13th!

July 5th

July 24th

July 5th

July 24th

Camelina has an 85-100 day maturity. Producers can wait longer to ensure the soil moisture and pre-seeding weed control is on target to produce an optimum camelina crop.

Camelina is quite versatile. It has excellent frost
resilience as a seedling. It can be sown early, or seeded later and can still beat the frost. Denis received 2.5 inches of rain the week after he seeded. His camelina emerged quickly and evenly.

His camelina crop is on it’s way to yielding 35-40bu or better!

Camelina has an 85-100 day maturity. Producers can wait longer to ensure the soil moisture and pre-seeding weed control is on target to produce an optimum camelina crop.

Camelina is quite versatile. It has excellent frost
resilience as a seedling. It can be sown early, or seeded later and can still beat the frost. Denis received 2.5 inches of rain the week after he seeded. His camelina emerged quickly and evenly.

His camelina crop is on it’s way to yielding 35-40bu or better!

Camelina has an 85-100 day maturity. Producers can wait longer to ensure the soil moisture and pre-seeding weed control is on target to produce an optimum camelina crop.

Camelina is quite versatile. It has excellent frost
resilience as a seedling. It can be sown early, or seeded later and can still beat the frost. Denis received 2.5 inches of rain the week after he seeded. His camelina emerged quickly and evenly.

His camelina crop is on it’s way to yielding 35-40bu or better!

Denis, harvesting in late September, netted around 30 bu/acre before dockage. This from a crop that, agronomically speaking, had absolutely nothing going for it that season. “It was the worst year possible to experiment with a relatively new crop like Camelina on such crappy land,” said Garry. “As with any new crop it’s kind of scary.”

Being the local agronomist, consultant, and generally responsible person, Garry tried to put on a brave face in that very worrisome period between April and June of that crop year. “I said don’t worry, after the rain it’ll come up. But honestly I thought I was going to get tarred and feathered.”

No one could believe how robust the Camelina was, once it emerged. “It’s a determined little thing. It’s so not normal.” But no one could argue with the facts on the ground. There it was – not just growing but thriving. “This doesn’t act like any crop I’ve ever seen. You turn your back on it and it threatens to go nuts.” To have so many variables stacked up against it: drought, weed competition, not much in the way of nutrients in extremely marginal soil, and to lie dormant for so long – most crops would just throw in the towel, said Garry. “This is a little crazy. I’d say when farmers hear about this kind of thing it should kind of freak everybody out. But it’s kind of fascinating too. I think it’s going to do really well.”

By David Roberts | Smart Earth Camelina

Interested in growing camelina this season?

Hear from some of our Saskatchewan based growers who have made the switch...

Benefits

☑️ Camelina is a unique low-input dryland oilseed crop. On some farms input costs as low as $100/acre can yield profits as high as $100/acre.

☑️ Seed costs as low as $25 per acre.

☑️ Our markets are domestic – no problems with Chinese exports

☑️ Camelina can be produced on marginal lands with significantly lower inputs than canola while providing competitive yields on lighter soils and a shorter growing season.

☑️ It is resistant to flea beetles, blackleg and blackspot. Seed treatment with insecticide and fungicides and late-season insecticide sprays are not necessary.

☑️ We’re a Saskatchewan company – your money stays here to support local business, creating jobs here and helping us re-invest in the province.

We have just a handful of 2020 contracts left ….to find out more call our crop production specialist Carlene at 306-220-2737 or fill out the contact form below and we'll contact you.

Thanks!
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Interested in growing camelina this season?

Hear from some of our Saskatchewan based growers who have made the switch...

Benefits

☑️ Camelina is a unique low-input dryland oilseed crop. On some farms input costs as low as $100/acre can yield profits as high as $100/acre.

☑️ Seed costs as low as $25 per acre.

☑️ Our markets are domestic – no problems with Chinese exports

☑️ Camelina can be produced on marginal lands with significantly lower inputs than canola while providing competitive yields on lighter soils and a shorter growing season.

☑️ It is resistant to flea beetles, blackleg and blackspot. Seed treatment with insecticide and fungicides and late-season insecticide sprays are not necessary.

☑️ We’re a Saskatchewan company – your money stays here to support local business, creating jobs here and helping us re-invest in the province.

We have just a handful or 2020 contracts left ….to find out more call our crop production specialist Carlene at 306-220-2737 or fill out the contact form below and we'll contact you.

Thanks!
This field is required
This field is required