News & Updates

Recently published blog posts on our Camelina breeding and production community. Read to learn how researchers, growers, or even bees love Camelina.

Bees love those pretty yellow camelina flowers

Bees love those pretty yellow camelina flowers
Researchers have found winter-grown camelina works very well as a forage resource for bees combing for nectar on sparse ground in early spring. Scientists with the United States Department of Agriculture planted pennycress, canola and camelina to see how bees responded to their early spring blooms. "All three cover crops had high insect visitation during their anthesis periods," says a paper delivered to the combined International Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America and Soil Science Society of America. "Pennycress attracted mainly flies, while winter camelina and winter canola attracted both flies and bees. All three crops provide an important forage resource to pollinators during early spring when there is little else on the agricultural landscape that is blooming." The trial was part of an experiment in the use of winter oilseeds in the Northern Plains region of the United States. Traditionally the harsh winters,...
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Camelina Approved for Broiler Chicken Meal in Canada

Camelina Approved for Broiler Chicken Meal in Canada
Smart Earth Seeds is pleased to announce that Camelina meal has been approved for the first time in Canada for use in broiler chicken feed. Smart Earth Seeds is the leading global Camelina enterprise and has been working to develop Camelina as a valuable new oilseed rotation crop in Western Canada. Thanks to the efforts of the University of Saskatchewan, Department of Animal and Poultry Science and Feeds Innovation Institute with support of the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture (ADF), The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has given approval for feeding cold-pressed non-solvent extracted camelina meal to broiler chickens at up to 12% inclusion. This work is continuing as the university is initiating a second application for approval for laying hens. "This is a major step forward for Camelina in Canada," said Jack Grushcow founder and CEO of Smart Earth Seeds. "We are now able to develop local markets for our high quality Camelina...
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